Interest Rate Parity: Definition, Calculator, Importance in Education Loan

interest rate parity

Interest Rate Parity (IRP) is an economic principle that relates the exchange rate between two currencies to the interest rates of those currencies. It is based on the idea that the projected return on investment (ROI) in overseas money should be equal to the return on an equivalent investment in the domestic currency, after accounting for the exchange rate. IRP is important in international finance and plays a role in currency trading, education loans, and arbitrage opportunities. However, various factors, such as transaction costs, capital controls, and market imperfections, can affect the actual exchange rates and deviate from the theoretical parity conditions. 

Forms of Interest Rate Parity

There are two primary forms of IRP: Covered IRP (CIRP) and Uncovered IRP (UIRP).

Covered Interest Rate Parity

CIRP assumes that investors can eliminate the exchange rate risk through forward contracts. It states that the interest rate differential between two nations should be the same as the percentage variation between the spot exchange rate and the forward exchange rate.

In simpler terms, CIRP suggests that if the interest rate differential between two countries is higher in one country compared to another, the forward exchange rate should reflect this difference, ensuring that investors would not have an advantage by borrowing in one currency, converting it to another, and investing it to earn a higher return.

interest rate parity

Uncovered Interest Rate Parity

UIRP assumes that investors do not hedge their currency exposure and are willing to accept the risk associated with exchange rate movements. It states that the expected change in the exchange rate between two currencies should be equal to the interest rate differential between the two countries.

In other words, UIRP suggests that if the interest rate in one country is higher than another, the currency of the country with higher interest rates should be expected to depreciate against the currency with lower interest rates. This expected depreciation compensates investors for the lower interest rate and brings about equilibrium.

Also Read: Forex Market & Trading Concepts for Beginners

Interest Rate Parity Calculation

Interest Rate Parity can be calculated using either the CIRP or the UIRP formula. Given below are the ways to calculate IRP.

CIRP Calculation

The formula for CIRP is as follows:

Forward Exchange Rate = Spot Exchange Rate × [(1 + Interest Rate in Foreign Currency) / (1 + Interest Rate in Domestic Currency)]

In this formula, the Spot Exchange Rate refers to the current exchange rate between the two currencies. The Interest Rate in Foreign Currency and the Interest Rate in Domestic Currency represent the respective interest rates in each country. By rearranging the formula, one can solve for any of the variables. 

UIRP Calculation

The formula for UIRP is as follows:

Expected Change in Exchange Rate = Interest Rate Differential

In this formula, the Expected Change in Exchange Rate refers to the expected percentage change in the exchange rate between the two currencies over a given period. The Interest Rate Differential represents the difference between the interest rates in the two countries.

For example, if Country A’s interest rate is 5% and Country B’s interest rate is 3%, the Interest Rate Differential comes to 2% (5% – 3%). This would indicate that the exchange rate between the two currencies is expected to change by approximately 2% over the specified period.

Also Read: Understanding TCS on Foreign Exchange and Remittance

Importance of IRP in Education Loan

Interest Rate Parity has implications for education loans, particularly for students seeking funding in a foreign currency. Here are a few points highlighting the importance of IRP in student loans:

Borrowing in a foreign currency

In some cases, students may choose to borrow study abroad student loans in a foreign currency to finance their education. IRP helps determine whether it is advantageous to borrow in a foreign currency or not. It ensures that the expected return on the investment in the foreign currency matches the return on an equivalent investment in the domestic currency after accounting for the exchange rate. This parity helps students make informed decisions about borrowing in foreign currencies based on interest rate differentials.

Also Read: Ways For Students To Finance Masters Abroad In 2023

Exchange rate risk

IRP also considers the exchange rate risk associated with borrowing in a foreign currency. CIRP suggests that investors can eliminate the exchange rate risk through forward contracts. Thus, students and lenders can hedge against potential currency fluctuations by entering into forward contracts to lock in the exchange rate at which the loan will be repaid. This provides stability and predictability in loan repayment amounts.

interest rate parity

Comparative interest rates

Interest Rate Parity takes into account the interest rate differentials between countries. When deciding on study abroad education loans, students can compare the interest rates offered in their home country with those offered in the foreign country where they plan to study. If there is a significant interest rate differential, students may choose to borrow in the currency with the lower interest rate, as long as the exchange rate compensates for the difference. IRP helps assess whether the potential benefits of borrowing in a foreign currency outweigh the risks.

Arbitrage opportunities

If IRP is violated in the education loan market, it may create opportunities for arbitrage. Arbitrageurs could exploit interest rate differentials and exchange rate discrepancies to make risk-free profits. Financial institutions and markets monitor IRP to identify such arbitrage opportunities and ensure that markets remain efficient and balanced.

Market efficiency

Interest Rate Parity serves as a benchmark for evaluating the efficiency of financial markets. If IRP is consistently violated, it suggests that market participants are not taking advantage of interest rate differentials to equalize returns across currencies. This may indicate market inefficiencies or factors such as transaction costs, capital controls, or other exchange rate barriers.

Also Read: How Does International Money Transfer Work: A Comprehensive Guide

FAQs

What is interest rate parity also known as?

IRP is also known as the “asset approach to exchange rate determination”.

What is the difference between UIRP and CIRP?

The primary difference between UIRP and CIRP is how each handles the exchange rate risk associated with interest rate differentials.

What is the importance of IRP in Education Loans?

IRP enables students to calculate costs and evaluate risks and potential benefits associated with student loans borrowed in foreign currencies. 

To learn more about international education loans and international money transfers, stay in tune with Fly Finance. Don’t forget to contact us if you need more information. 

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